Taproot – Book Review

35833506Author: Keezy Young

127 pages

Genre: Fantasy Graphic Novel

Synopsis: Blue is having a hard time moving on. He’s in love with his best friend. He’s also dead. Luckily, Hamal can see ghosts, leaving Blue free to haunt him to his heart’s content. But something eerie is happening in town, leaving the local afterlife unsettled, and when Blue realizes Hamal’s strange ability may be putting him in danger, Blue has to find a way to protect him, even if it means… leaving him.

Source: Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)

This book tells the story of a gardener who can see ghosts.

The book’s concept is very interesting and its execution is done perfectly.

The art’s beautiful and I love how the colors work, how they change throughout the story and how they work with each character.

The story’s short, simple, sweet and compelling.

All of the characters are lovable and have something special about them.

I really like this book, I hope you read it too.

Rating: 5 stars

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A Stolen Kiss (Stolen Royals #1) – Book Review

28497161Author: Kelsey Keating

346 pages

Genre: Fantasy Young Adult

Synopsis: A stolen kiss. An unstable curse. One big mess in the making.

Derric Harver never expected to amount to anything more than the palace stableboy, but when Princess Maria’s curse keeps her from accepting a prince’s proposal, she turns to him for help, and he doesn’t dare refuse.

With the help of a lady’s maid and a prince, Derric and Maria embark on a dangerous adventure to find the sorceress who cast the curse. Along the way they battle deadly creatures and make new friends–all the while struggling with the undeniable chemistry between them. Reaching their destination won’t be easy, but the true danger peril in the truths they’ve fought for years to keep hidden.

Source: Borrowed (from Every Book Counts)

I’ve always loved fairy tales, specially when they’re ”adapted” to audiences that aren’t kids, so when my sister told me about this book, I knew I needed to read it.

This book tells the story of a princess trying to break her curse.

The writing itself is simple yet compelling.

This book has an amazing story. It’s simple, it’s sweet, and yet, it’ll make you want to read more and more. It also features hilarious moments and unexpected plot twists.

To top it off, this book has an amazing set of characters. They’re lovable and yet they’re not that kind of innocent and “lovable” they’re annoying. They also experience amazing character development.

Rating: 5 stars

Anything worth having is worth struggling to achieve.

Black Seed (Seed World #2) – Book Review

White Seed (Seed World #1) – Book Review

34325240Author: Kenneth Marshall

316 pages

Genre: Science Fiction

Synopsis: The White Seed Brings Life to Worlds

Three thousand years ago, the seeds arrived from Earth on hundreds of worlds. The developed worlds formed the Network, connected only by radio and laser. Since the time of the seeds, nothing but information has traveled between the stars. Now a starship, The Child of Ambition, is changing that. Her first mission: to explore the dark worlds, the ones that failed.

The Black Seed Folds Space

Not an object, but a place—a manifold in space. A thing so hard to create, the Ancients only ever made three. The heart of a starship, or the core of the deadliest weapon in human history. The most precious thing in the Universe—or the most dangerous.

Alon Ienian—scientist, soldier, assassin. Member of a force so secret no operative will speak its true name. He came out of retirement to kill an old friend, and accepted a mission from his worst enemy, to save his home world from itself.

The black seed must be controlled, and Aestas—Summer World—holds the key. Outside air temperature: minus fifty degrees Celsius. After the oceans freeze and the weather ends, only the dead remain.

Source: Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)

This book is a somewhat direct sequel of the previous.

Writing wise, it’s a lot less messier than White Seed. It still has an assignment sheet, which is still useless.

Character wise, it’s the same, only Alon seems to have changed. Also, there are only two types of girls in this book- the badasses who use the word ‘fuck’ in every sentence and girly girls who are really cute and must be protected at all costs.

Story wise, it has the same skeleton as the previous book and I was able to predict plenty of plot points.

Overall, I didn’t like this book and wasn’t even able to finish it.

Rating: 1 star

Book Club Discussion

 

 

Smosh – Book Review

32471986Authors: Michael McDermott, Yale Stewart and David Atchison

Contributors: Franco Viglino and Jerry Gaylord

Genre: Graphic Novel

Synopsis: SMOSH, the Kings of YouTube Comedy, now bring their wildly popular humor sketches — namely, Super Virgin Squad, Box Man, and That Damn Neighbor — to comics! Behold, the Super Virgin Squad! Gathered together in the V-Cave, this group of unique individuals channel their sexual frustration into superhuman abilities to defend the physically weak, the socially awkward… the geekiest among us! Billy, Paulie, and Stevie’s latest mission? To save one of their moms from the presumably slimy seductions of a website swinger! Beware of That Damn Neighbor! Benny Jean and Cletus just want to drink beer and admire their lawn flamingo, but the weirdo next door will not be ignored! Witness a tale of friendship, fame, and freak accidents as Box Man’s origin springs to life, in crazy detail! Thrill as Box Man and friends try to make sense of his weird twist of fate, attempting to make him the first-ever cardboard hero and, when that fails, settling on celebrity spokesperson. But can a move made in desperation ever go wrong?

Source: Netgalley (in exchange for an honest review)

This book’s art is very similar to that of vintage comic books, which is possibly the only thing this book did right.

The story is uninteresting, it’s, in a word, boring.

The character’s aren’t that great either, they’re simply annoying.

Rating: 1 star

The Mistery of Marie Rogêt (C. Auguste Dupin #2) – Book Review

C. Auguste Dupin #1 – Book Review

26474525Author: Edgar Allan Poe

76 pages

Genre: Classic Mystery

Synopsis: Poe’s detective character C. Auguste Dupin and his sidekick the unnamed narrator undertake the unsolved murder of Marie Roget in Paris. The body of Roget, a perfume shop employee, is found in the Seine River and the press takes a keen interest in the mystery. Dupin remarks that the newspapers “create a sensation … [rather] than to further the cause of truth.” Even so, he uses the newspaper reports to get into the mind of the murderer. Dupin uses his skills of ratiocination to determine that a single murderer was involved who dragged her by the cloth belt around her waist before dumping her body off a boat into the river. Finding the boat, Dupin suggests, will lead the police to the murderer.”

Source: Bought (in English)

This book tells the story of yet another murder that Dupin needs to solve.

The writing’s absolutely charming, even though it can get difficult to read more than 12 pages in one sitting (or maybe that has to do with my copy’s lettering, perhaps it’s too small).

The cast of characters is the same as they were in Rue Morgue.

Story wise, there isn’t much to it. This book is simply a conversation between Dupin and the narrator (even though Dupin speaks practically to himself) about pieces of news. It feels underwhelming after the amazing first story.

Rating: 3 stars

Experience has shown, and a true philosophy will always show, that a vast, perhaps the larger, portion of truth arises from the seemingly irrelevant.

 

The Murders in the Rue Morgue (C. Auguste Dupin #1) – Book Review

3301759Author: Edgar Allan Poe

38 pages

Genre: Classic Mystery

Synopsis: The Murders in the Rue Morgue is a short story by Edgar Allan Poe published in Graham’s Magazine in 1841. It has been recognized as the first modern detective story; Poe referred to it as one of his “tales of ratiocination”.

Source: Bought (in English)

This book tells the story of two horrendous murders.

The story is very intriguing, it’s seen as the first detective story ever to exist.

The characters are interesting, we can see that they spawned certain tropes in fiction, specially in this genre.

The writing’s amazing. It feels foreign at first, however, it’s easy to get used to it.

I’ve always loved Edgar Allan Poe and I’m glad to have finally read this short story.

Rating: 5 stars

Coincidences, in general, are great stumbling-blocks in the way of that class of thinkers who have been educated to know nothing of the theory of probabilities—that theory to which the most glorious objects of human research are indebted for the most glorious of illustration.

C. Auguste Dupin #2 – Book Review

 

1984 – Book Review

9577857Author: George Orwell

198 pages

Genre: Classic Dystopian

Synopsis: ‘It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.’

Winston Smith works for the Ministry of truth in London, chief city of Airstrip One. Big Brother stares out from every poster, the Thought Police uncover every act of betrayal. When Winston finds love with Julia, he discovers that life does not have to be dull and deadening, and awakens to new possibilities. Despite the police helicopters that hover and circle overhead, Winston and Julia begin to question the Party; they are drawn towards conspiracy. Yet Big Brother will not tolerate dissent – even in the mind. For those with original thoughts they invented Room 101 . . .

Source: Borrowed (in Portuguese)

This book tells the story of a man who lives in London after a great Revolution.

The characters are really simple, there isn’t much depth.

The story’s also quite simple, I was able to predict some focal story points. However, that only makes the book better.

You see, this book constructs a really interesting and intricate world. That’s where Orwell gets the cake, he’s able to whip up a nightmarish future, it doesn’t matter if you read it after 1984. The metaphors and symbols are important to everyone, specially now.

Rating: 5 stars

 

Perhaps a lunatic was simply a minority of one.